Funding formula to go?

There are reports that the National Funding formula is to be abandoned. I received this from the Lib Dem press office just a few moments ago.

The Liberal Democrats have responded to reports that the Conservatives are to bow to massive backbench pressure and abandon their proposed shake-up of school funding.
Liberal Democrat Education spokesperson John Pugh said:
Finally, the Conservatives have been forced to re-think their deeply flawed funding formula, which would see savage cuts to schools in most areas of the country. Their proposals were utterly cynical, taking from some areas to give to others, rather than committing to give all schools the additional funding they need.”

I am surprised to hear this even being discussed during purdah as it amounts to a change of policy already under consultation.

Locally, if it proves to be true and not just electioneering, I am both glad for the rural primary schools, 100 of them in Oxfordshire, where the cash for the school was going to be cut (see earlier posts), but sad that Oxfordshire and the other F40 authorities will have to wait longer for a fairer distribution of funds to schools.

However, I am not surprised at the possibility of an announcement. Trying to reform school funding in the middle of the largest increase in pupil numbers in almost half a century was always going to lead to electoral disaster. One wonders why the Tories backbenchers waited until the day before the local elections to put on the pressure as any announcement has surely come too late to influence the voters in the shire counties voting tomorrow.

Then there is the issue of where the Conservatives now stand on funding schools? Unless they can come up with something better than just a U-turn on their formula they will still be leaving school looking at a funding shortfall over the life of the next parliament. Reciting the mantra of strong leadership on school funding just looks silly in the circumstances.

Finally, it doesn’t look like good government to change your mind in their way. There will certainly need to be some clarification of the government’s position. And, what next, a change of mind over selective schools?

 

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2 thoughts on “Funding formula to go?

  1. The proposed funding formula and the funding crisis currently affecting schools are two separate issues. Even if the funding formula is abandoned it will still leave schools facing a funding crisis which can’t be alleviated, as Nick Gibb suggests, by negotiating a lower contract for photocopying.

    In the meantime, Schools Week have reported on the alleged Tory abandonment of the proposed formula here: http://schoolsweek.co.uk/tories-claim-school-finances-need-strong-stable-leadership-as-mps-attack-funding-formula/

    • Janet,

      Far be it for me to stand up for Nick Gibb, but my experience with TeachVac shows how difficult it is to encourage economies even in areas of high spending. The Teacher Associations, especially NAHT and ASCL could do far more in identifying areas of high spend and working out how the sector can drive down costs. More than a year after the White Paper and we are little further forward on a national portal for vacancies such as has existed in Scotland for years. The same is true for supply teacher costs; insurance and legal fees for caddies and indeed all academy overheads. Where are those Tories that pilloried local authorities for retaining too much money for central overheads in the debate about MAT’s central costs: nowhere to be seen or heard. Why, because there is a profit to be made from selling these services.

      The real issue facing school funding will be over pay. You cannot hold down pay for ever and when the market forces an increase there will be real issues unless funding increases for all regardless o how the cash is distributed.

      John Howson

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